DDL | Torrent
Release number 5! So excited to see the reactions our projects have been getting. So much love goes into these releases, and we all really hope you’re enjoying them. As usual, big ups to the JNP guys for their original translation (which has, again, been meticulously re-created in a second subtitle track,) Lynxara for the ever-bangin’ QC job, Ignis for re-timing, and Heat for some special guest TLC work. Fever time!
I should also mention, we’re ALWAYS recruiting for all positions. We’re a small group as it is, but there’s plenty of projects we’d like to pick up (one of which you should see in the near future, hint hint /m/ thread,) so if you’d like to join us, head on down to #SHT on Rizon.

DDL | Torrent

Release number 5! So excited to see the reactions our projects have been getting. So much love goes into these releases, and we all really hope you’re enjoying them. As usual, big ups to the JNP guys for their original translation (which has, again, been meticulously re-created in a second subtitle track,) Lynxara for the ever-bangin’ QC job, Ignis for re-timing, and Heat for some special guest TLC work. Fever time!

I should also mention, we’re ALWAYS recruiting for all positions. We’re a small group as it is, but there’s plenty of projects we’d like to pick up (one of which you should see in the near future, hint hint /m/ thread,) so if you’d like to join us, head on down to #SHT on Rizon.

DDL | Torrent
As usual, big ups to Heat for translating, Ignis for Timing, Lynx for QCing, and Azrael for encoding. Enjoy~

DDL | Torrent

As usual, big ups to Heat for translating, Ignis for Timing, Lynx for QCing, and Azrael for encoding. Enjoy~

FUTURE FRIENDLY

(discussing TokuRawRevolution going down)

Misha: Actually, I'm really lucky there's a mirror of those BFJ encodes floating around, because I didn't have anything past episode 2.

Misha: So the project would've been as good as stalled.

KingRanger: well

KingRanger: like I told you

KingRanger: I have toei channel ones

KingRanger: if you need

Misha: Yeah, I'd have SOMETHING, but I wanted to use DVD rips so that I wouldn't have to do a lot of re-timing when the Blu-rays inevitably come out.

Misha: And because the old Toei channel masters were ass on a stick.

Misha: Though I really appreciate the offer.

KingRanger: you think they will release blurays of that?

Misha: They will eventually, same as they did with the DVDs.

Misha: If it takes 20 years, they'll do it.

Misha: Once authoring costs are down, there's no reason not to double dip. Or triple dip in some cases.

Misha: The Sentai mastered on film were only done on 16mm though, so a 1080p telecine is about the maximum resolution you can get out of that source.

Misha: A 2k telecine wouldn't reveal any extra detail.

Misha: Picture it. 1080p Miss America bulge.

KingRanger: hah

KingRanger: they should do that in 3d

Misha: Actually just choked I laughed so hard.

KingRanger: ":P

Adventures in QC #2

Balance

We’ve established that Timeranger is Super Sentai as science fiction. This means the first few episodes are pretty heavy with exposition and technobabble. One of the most important bits of exposition in the entire series occurs in episode 2, when Tac starts explaining the rules of time-travel and talking about balance.

For awhile we were fairly baffled at what exactly Tac meant during the entire sequence, especially when he used the term ‘balance’. You can’t really refine dialog you don’t entirely understand to begin with, either. Since Timeranger’s technobabble last episode was rooted in reality, it seemed most logical to assume that Tac’s time-travel explanation had a similar basis. In this case, QC’s job was to figure out what it was.

Sometimes the easiest way to figure out what’s going on with a show is to look at other shows the same creators worked on and see if any patterns emerge. In Timeranger’s case, its head writer Yasuko Kobayashi worked on another major tokusatsu time-travel series in 2007, Kamen Rider Den-O. The time-travel system in Den-O is based loosely on real world quantum mechanics, especially ideas about singularity.

Ordinarily quantum mechanics would seem much too complicated to show up in a kid’s show, but if Kobayashi did it Den-O then there was reason for us to think she might’ve done the same in Timeranger. Some research turned up three principles of quantum mechanics that seemed to fit Timeranger’s time-travel rules and Tac’s expository dialog: quantum entanglement, quantum superposition, and the Copenhagen Interpretation.

Real world quantum entanglement occurs when two objects, typically subatomic particles, are connected such that any force that affects one of the paired particles will have an immediate effect on the other, no matter how far apart they are in space-time. Quantum superposition is the idea that any system which can be in more than one configuration can exist in both configurations simultaneously. The Copenhagen Interpretation is a theory of quantum mechanics which states that a system stops being in superposition when it is observed by an outsider.

Timeranger turns these ideas about the behavior of waves and particles into ideas about how time-travelers interact with the universe, much the same way Kobayashi did in Den-O. Quantum entanglement becomes the idea that through time-travel, historical eras become entangled with each other in a system that behaves according to the rules of quantum mechanics rather than more classical ideas of linearity. So in Timeranger, the years 2000 and 3000 became entangled during the initial time-travel event that sent the Londarz and the Timerangers back in time.

Because of the entanglement of the two eras, the years 2000 and 3000 now exist in a state of quantum superposition. It is certainly possible for both years to be changed, but those changes right now are merely potential changes. Tac’s dialog makes it clear that as long as the time-travelers remain in the past, this state of superposition will continue to exist. The possible changes that the time-travelers could be making to the years 2000 and 3000 won’t become actual changes.

The Copenhagen Interpretation explains why Tac’s time-travel rules exist. If the Time Protection Bureau sent additional time-travelers back to the year 2000, the second group would observe the first group. Anything that group had changed in the year 2000 would become a permanent change with consequences that would affect the year 3000 in a linear way. If only part of the original time-travel group returned to the year 3000, it would have similar consequences.

If the Timerangers can take all of the Londarz into custody and return with them in one trip, though, then the principle behind the Copenhagen Interpretation would indicate that the years 2000 and 3000 shouldn’t change. No one outside the initial time-travel system would be able to observe it, leaving the time-travel itself in a state of superposition that could have no effect on the timeline’s history. This has to be the desired balance Tac is talking about.

We made the edits to Tac’s exposition in this episode by working from this basic theory of how Timeranger’s time-travel should work. Checks made against future episodes have indicated that it’s a solid theory in terms of describing the show’s events. While the audience clearly doesn’t need to understand the science involved just to make sense of Timeranger’s plot, it helped us to understand how Tac’s explanation should be worded.

~Lynxara

DDL | Torrent
As usual, big ups to Heat for translating, Ignis for Timing, Lynx for QCing, and Azrael for encoding. Enjoy~

DDL | Torrent

As usual, big ups to Heat for translating, Ignis for Timing, Lynx for QCing, and Azrael for encoding. Enjoy~

Adventures in QC #1

Cryostasis

One of the most distinct elements of Timeranger, as entries in the Super Sentai franchise go, is that the team doesn’t execute their enemy at the end of each week’s battle. Instead, the criminal monster is shrunk down and frozen into an immobile form about the size of a popsicle.

The term for this process in Japanese is asshukureitou, a combination of the words for ‘compression’ and ‘cold storage’. It’s ultimately just a bit of technobabble lifted from the Japanese for vapor-compression refrigeration. It felt inappropriate to say that Timeranger was refrigerating their bad guys, though.

From context, asshukureitou seemed more like one of those sci-fi jargon words that was based on science fact, while describing a concept that wasn’t entirely possible. So we decided to translate the term that way, by finding some way to transform it into a bit of English sci-fi jargon that would carry roughly the same meaning.

Translating made-up terms is a tricky thing for any translation, but particularly of tokusatsu. Fans of this genre are big on the idea of authenticity. Localization is, perhaps rightfully, associated with liberal adaptations like Power Rangers. Fans who care enough to watch the show in Japanese want to feel like they’re getting something authentic.

Timeranger is, fortunately, not a show grounded extensively in Japanese culture. Timeranger’s basis is science fiction, a genre that played host to plenty of pioneering English-language authors H.G. Wells, E.E. Smith, and Robert Heinlein. So English should have no shortage of appropriate sci-fi jargon to apply to Timeranger’s Japanese sci-fi jargon.

QC’s job in this case was simply to figure out which terms might work best out of what was available. Cryostasis emerged as an early contender. I’d like to say we went with the term because of something impeccable about its sci-fi lineage, but that’s not really the case.

It’s not unusual for Super Sentai to take direct inspiration from English-language films, particularly big Hollywood blockbusters. In Timeranger’s case, its creators were clearly fans of the 1993 Sylvester Stallone film Demolition Man.

Demolition Man is about a 21st century cop who gets framed for murder and sentenced to “cryoprison,” where he’s frozen for 70 years before being awakened in a future that can’t otherwise cope with 21st century criminals. Timeranger is basically Demolition Man in reverse: cops from the the year 3000 travel back to save the past from dangerous 30th century criminals.

Cryostasis is the term Demolition Man uses for cryoprison’s freezing process, so it seemed the most appropriate way to translate asshukureitou. Now, it’s true that Demolition Man’s cryostasis doesn’t shrink people, but shrinkage is actually a property of real-world cryostasis. Cells become compressed as the water in them is extracted and turned to ice crytals.

In light of that, we decided not to add additional explicit references to compression or shrinking in dialog. Some direct references to compression instead survive in other parts of the script. For instance, the “press” in Time Robo’s Press Blizzard, which you’ll see in episode 2, is a direct reference to the English word compression.

~Lynxara